Know About Gluten: Do You Really Have Celiac Disease?


Know About Gluten: Do You Really Have Celiac Disease?

You should Know About Gluten, it is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley that provides structural support for the cell walls of these grains. It makes the gluten molecules stick together. There are several types of gluten, so the word “gluten” refers to the most common form.

It is thought that a lack of gluten can cause or contribute to common health problems like allergies, Celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and asthma. When people eat wheat flour, a substance called “polyglutamine” is released into the bloodstream. This compound acts as a messenger for signals that need to be communicated between the cells of the body. An infection in the intestines, for example, sends a message to the brain telling it to release histamines, which then enter the bloodstream and lead to wheezing and itchy eyes.

Facts To Know About Gluten

Gluten is also believed to be one of the contributing factors to depression. Some studies have shown that when people suffer from depression, they have higher levels of the anti-histamine called 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) than people who do not have a diagnosed mental illness.

Know About Gluten: Do You Really Have Celiac Disease?
Know About Gluten: Do You Really Have Celiac Disease?

Gluten has been touted as a possible contributor to infertility. Many men and women believe that their problem with infertility may be due to eating gluten. Many other medical conditions may be caused by a diet that is made up of foods that contain gluten. That’s why it is important to know about gluten before you begin to eat or drink any food containing it.

There have been many studies and scientific studies that have tried to confirm or refute the theory that gluten causes certain health problems. But the latest research suggests that the connection between gluten and certain diseases or illnesses are not as “exact” as originally believed. However, it still appears that some people who eat a high amount of gluten may be more susceptible to certain ailments than those who don’t.

The Theory Of Gluten

Some people believe that gluten is a contributor to celiac disease. For people with celiac disease, gluten is the main reason for the chronic intestinal inflammation. When people with celiac disease eat gluten, the antibodies in their bloodstream will react with the gluten molecules, which cause the body to produce more of them.

People who have certain diseases, like Crohn’s disease, may be more likely to develop a gluten allergy. When people with this disease to eat a lot of gluten, it could lead to an allergic reaction, which can lead to inflammation and damage in the small intestine.

In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. This condition doesn’t appear to be linked to celiac disease. But there have been studies showing that gluten intolerance is being mistakenly diagnosed as celiac disease.

Know About Gluten: Symptoms

If you experience any of the following common symptoms, you should get a physical and then consult your doctor immediately. These symptoms could be a sign of gluten intolerance. They could also be caused by something else.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) can also be a symptom of gluten intolerance. Those with IBD may experience intestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain and constipation.

Know About Gluten: Do You Really Have Celiac Disease?
Know About Gluten: Do You Really Have Celiac Disease?

Celiac disease can cause constipation. It can also cause someone to lose weight and develop anemia. When someone eats this, he or she is more likely to suffer from anemia and vitamin deficiencies.

Bottom Line

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and this intolerance can also affect the function of the immune system. If you feel that you may have either of these conditions. It is important to get the proper tests to determine whether you really have one of these conditions.

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